Akinwumi Adesina – Most Reputable Africans – Joyce Banda Arrest

Akinwumi Adesina | President, African Development Bank

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Akinwumi Ayodeji Adesina is the 8th elected President of the African Development Bank Group. He was elected to the position on May 28, 2015 by the Bank’s Board of Governors at its Annual Meetings in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire.

He took office at the Bank’s headquarters in Abidjan on September 1, 2015 and will serve an initial five-year term.

Adesina, 58, is a distinguished development economist and agricultural development expert with 25 years of international experience. He is the first Nigerian to serve as President of the Bank Group.

Adesina served as Nigeria’s Minister of Agriculture and Rural Development from 2011 to 2015, during which time he implemented bold policy reforms in the fertilizer sector and pursued innovative agricultural investment programs to expand opportunities for the private sector.

He was previously Vice-President (Policy and Partnerships) of the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA). He was also Associate Director (Food Security) at the Rockefeller Foundation in New York, where he worked for a decade (1998-2008) in senior leadership positions, including as Regional Office Director and Representative for Southern Africa.

Adesina was Principal Economist and Social Science Research Coordinator for the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Principal Economist and Coordinator of the West Africa Rice Economics Task Force at the West Africa Rice Development Association (WARDA) and an Assistant Principal Economist at the International Crop Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT). From 2008 to 2010, Adesina was the President of the African Association of Agricultural Economists.

Adesina has received a number of global awards for his leadership and work in agriculture. In 2010, United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon appointed him as one of 17 global leaders to spearhead the Millennium Development Goals, along with Bill Gates, the Spanish Prime Minister and the President of Rwanda. He was named Person of the Year by Forbes Africa magazine in 2013.

Adesina earned a first-class honours Bachelor’s degree in Agricultural Economics from the University of Ife, Nigeria in 1981. In 1988 he completed a PhD in Agricultural Economics at Purdue University in the United States, where he won the Outstanding PhD Thesis Award for his research work. He also won the prestigious Rockefeller Foundation Social Science Post-Doctoral Fellowship in 1988, which launched his international career in global agricultural development.

Born on February 6, 1960, Adesina speaks fluent French and English.

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DR. Joyce Banda Malawi – An Interview with Joyce Banda, Former President of Malawi

JOYCE BANDA SERVED as President of Malawi from 2012-2014 following the unexpected death of previous President Bingu wa Mutharika. She was Malawi’s first female vice-president and eventually became Malawi’s first female president. In 2014, Forbes magazine voted Banda the most powerful woman in Africa and the 40th most powerful woman in the world.

Prior to assuming office, she established the Joyce Banda Foundation, which seeks to empower Malawian women and children through education, health, and economic opportunities. Her foundation has improved the economic standing of over 400,000 women through business training and saving circles and also tends to 35 Orphan Care Centers, which feed approximately 1,500 children a day in Malawi.

A tumultuous re-election campaign in 2014 saw Banda lose to her opponent Peter Mutharika, the brother of former President Bingu wa Mutharika. Many attribute her election loss to the “Cashgate” scandal of 2013, a corruption scandal that implicated high-level governmental officials and triggered the dismissal of Banda’s entire executive cabinet. After attempting to nullify the election results, Banda left Malawi to focus on her foundation work and champion women’s rights abroad.

The Politic contacted President Banda to learn more about her current efforts to promote women’s rights, education, and economic empowerment, as well as to hear her perspective on how Malawi can best pursue development in the coming years.

Joyce Banda President of Malawi to give lecture at K-State

The first woman to serve as president of Malawi is scheduled to deliver on Jan. 29 a Landon Lecture at Kansas State University, officials said Sunday.

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Former President Joyce Banda, who led the African nation from 2012 to 2014, has been credited with working to shed laws that restricted press freedom, civil liberties and the democratic process.

“As the second female to lead an African nation, President Banda helped turn her country’s economy around and has been a longtime champion of women’s rights,” said Jackie Hartman, chairwoman of the lecture series.

Banda is to speak at 10:30 a.m. Jan. 29 in Forum Hall in the K-State Union. Her Manhattan talk is open to the public.

Prior to serving as president, Banda was the nation’s vice president, foreign minister, minister of gender and child welfare, and was in Parliament. She championed legislation in 2006 designed to prevent domestic violence against women and girls in Malawi.

Joyce Banda – ‘readying for 2019 election’

Blantyre- Exiled Malawian former president Joyce Banda is reportedly preparing to come back to the southern African country in preparation for the 2019 elections, a report said on Sunday.

According to Nyasa Times, Banda’s People’s Party (PP) said she was preparing to launch her political return soon.

Banda went on a self-imposed exile after losing the country’s election to her rival President Peter Mutharika in 2014.

“She will be coming, though I cannot say when but for sure she will vie for the presidency in the 2019 elections and she will win,” PP’s northern region governor Makwenda Chunga Chunga was quoted as saying.

This came amid speculation on president Mutharika’s health.

Reports on Saturday indicated that Mutharika’s prolonged stay abroad following the United Nations General Assembly in New York two weeks ago, had triggered illness rumours.

An influential quasi-religious body, the Public Affairs Committee had since criticised the government for the continued “secrecy” surrounding the president’s continued absence.

“Mutharika is a public figure, therefore, as a public figure Malawians have a right to know to [his] whereabouts,” the religious body was quoted as saying.

Malawi President Joyce Banda assisting the women and youth gain social and political empowerment-

President Banda’s mission in life is to assist the women and youth gain social and political empowerment through entrepreneurship and education. She has spent the past thirty years as a development practitioner, a philanthropist and a champion for social justice and equality. She has a strong passion for women, children and the under-privileged. In this regard, she has been involved several development and humanitarian work through the following platforms:
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She established the Joyce Banda Foundation in 1998 and the Foundation provides integrated rural development services to over 300,000 resource poor beneficiaries. The Foundation provides services in the following areas:

Joyce Banda – An Interview with Joyce Banda

JOYCE BANDA SERVED as President of Malawi from 2012-2014 following the unexpected death of previous President Bingu wa Mutharika. She was Malawi’s first female vice-president and eventually became Malawi’s first female president. In 2014, Forbes magazine voted Banda the most powerful woman in Africa and the 40th most powerful woman in the world.

Prior to assuming office, she established the Joyce Banda Foundation, which seeks to empower Malawian women and children through education, health, and economic opportunities. Her foundation has improved the economic standing of over 400,000 women through business training and saving circles and also tends to 35 Orphan Care Centers, which feed approximately 1,500 children a day in Malawi.

A tumultuous re-election campaign in 2014 saw Banda lose to her opponent Peter Mutharika, the brother of former President Bingu wa Mutharika. Many attribute her election loss to the “Cashgate” scandal of 2013, a corruption scandal that implicated high-level governmental officials and triggered the dismissal of Banda’s entire executive cabinet. After attempting to nullify the election results, Banda left Malawi to focus on her foundation work and champion women’s rights abroad.

The Politic contacted President Banda to learn more about her current efforts to promote women’s rights, education, and economic empowerment, as well as to hear her perspective on how Malawi can best pursue development in the coming years.

The Politic: To begin, what issues have you focused on throughout your professional career? How did you first become involved in politics?

Joyce Banda: I’ve spent my whole life on the development platform working in rural areas to try to change the lives of women and girls. My mission in life is to assist women and youth in social and political empowerment through business and education. So from 1981, what I have done is to find ways to enable my fellow women through economic empowerment.

I started by forming an organization to assist fellow women as a result of the fact that I myself had spent 10 years in an abusive marriage. I realized that economic empowerment for women was key to social and political empowerment. I’ve spent my life before politics forming an organization that addresses issues affecting women and girls. [I founded] the National Association of Business Women in Malawi, which provided micro-financing to 15,000 women. Next, [I founded] the Young Women Leaders Network, which mobilized young women and served as a one-stop destination for the government to appoint young women into positions of leadership. Then, in 1997, I received the Africa Prize for Leadership for the Sustainable End of Hunger [from] the New York Hunger Project. I spent many years as the national advisor of its program in Malawi. My final project was the Joyce Banda Foundation [beginning in 2010].

The Joyce Banda Foundation has five pillars. First, income into the household, believing that if the household gets income through the woman, the children in that household shall go to school. The second pillar is girls’ education, believing that when girls go to school, they are less likely to marry early, give birth prematurely, and die giving birth. The third pillar is maternal health, specifically related to maternal mortality and HIV in Malawi. The fourth pillar is leadership. I believe that when women get into leadership and are supported to become leaders, they focus more on issues that affect women and girls.

Finally, the fifth pillar is human rights. This is the cross-cutting pillar into all the other four areas. The right of women to make their income and control it. The right of girls to go to school. The right of women to participate in leadership. I must mention that I have been fortunate in my life that all the four areas that I have championed resulted from personal experience. During my childhood, a very good friend of mine ended up dropping out of school because her family would not risk the six dollars needed to go back to school. At 14 years old, I made up my mind that I was going to spend my life assisting other girls [to complete their educations]. In 1984, I gave birth to my first-born child and almost died giving birth because I suffered postpartum hemorrhage. Maternal health became one of my pillars from that experience.

On the topic of maternal health, the Trump administration announced the expanded Mexico City Policy, which directly affects international healthcare providers. [This policy prevents non-governmental organizations from receiving most types of U.S. global health assistance if they “perform or actively promote abortion.”] Given that Malawi is one of the largest recipients of foreign aid, particularly from the United States, how do you think the expanded Mexico City Policy will impact development programs in Malawi, especially those involved in maternal and reproductive health?

I refuse to equate our development in Malawi to foreign aid. I believe truly that we can exit our dependence on foreign aid. We must look to ourselves, into our own country and our own resources. Without dwelling more on the U.S., I can say that even with limited resources, women [in Malawi] are not dying due to a lack of foreign aid, but because of the systems, the traditions, and the beliefs on the ground. Malawi has an 80% percent rural based population. As a result of that, they are very traditional, and some of their traditional beliefs impact maternal health. There are some foods that we cannot eat because we are told we cannot eat them; as a result pregnant women are unhealthy. Beliefs that you can’t talk to anybody else about pregnancy except your mother and mother-in-law mean that women are late going to the hospital if they are in labor. We also don’t have proper roads or ambulances to take these women to the clinic on time.

When I was in office, we tried to do with what we had. We introduced a program where we engaged these traditional leaders. Traditional leaders, who are mostly men, were seen for the first time on TV discussing ways of avoiding these unnecessary deaths, speaking to their subjects, telling them to deliver in the hospital, banning the delivery of babies by traditional bed-attendants, engaging the private sector to build holding shelters at the hospitals. We loosened the beliefs at the grassroots levels by convincing chiefs to appoint other women in the community. We educated men that they must get involved in the pregnancy of their wives. In almost 24 months, we were able to reduce maternal death from 675 per 100,000 to 460 per 100,000.

Other than foreign aid, there is so much that our country can do to tackle issues that negatively impact women and children. Our country officially has 2 billion barrels of oil, as well as gas, gold, rubies, etc. We have the fourth largest deposit of rare earth [metals]. All we need to do is focus on exploiting our natural resources for the good of the people. I think the path we should be taking in the developing world, particularly African countries, is not to say, “When are we going to get aid?” or “When are people going to give us money?”—because they are not going to be giving money forever—but rather to say, “What is it that we can do within what we have, with our natural resources?”

Joyce Banda Wanted Malawi Tourism On Your Radar for 2018 -19

Joyce Banda Wanted Malawi Tourism On Your Radar for 2018 -19

Malawi’s Wildlife at its very best
Recent developments mean Malawi is set to become one of the most complete destinations in Africa – Lake, Landscape, Culture and now Wildlife experiences of the very highest quality. This year Malawi made history with one of the worlds largest elephant translocations. Next year a further 250 elephants will be translocated from Majete Wildlife Reserve – making it a 400km journey.

Nyika National Park

Malawi’s wildlife is thriving thanks to the work of Malawi’s government in partnership with African Parks. Further plans are afoot to reintroduce cheetah early next year too, meaning it will have 3 reserves offering some of the highest quality safari experiences in the region.

Traditional, or not so traditional afternoon tea…
Satemwa Tea and Coffee Estate have been crafting superior teas and coffees for nearly 100 years. Their produce is made with passion and respect for the environment and its surrounding communities. These fine infusions are exported all around the world. Satemwa Tea has been sipped by the Queen in Claridges, provides Sainsbury’s with their best selling Red Label tea, and their hand made artisan teas are served at Heston Blumenthal’s Fat Duck, Enjoy afternoon tea in the beautiful estate gardens with milk and cream fresh from the estates own cows, followed by croquet on the lawn… yes, we’re not joking, this is in Malawi!

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Honeymoon Hotspot
Lake Malawi is a hit with Honeymooners. Its golden sandy beaches and sparkling waters combined with the country’s stunning scenery and intimate unspoilt wildlife experiences mean it delivers a perfect blend of romance and adventure.

There are so many romantic hideaways wiating to be discovered around the country that you really are spoilt for choice. Whether it’s the safari without the crowds, small and personal luxury lodges, secluded hideaways or the unbeatable lakeside sunsets, 2017 looks to be a loved up year for Malawi.

Malawi President Joyce Banda – First female president

Joyce Banda, who has made history becoming Malawi’s first female president and only the second woman to lead a country in Africa, has a track record of fighting for women’s rights.

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She took power over the weekend following the death of 78-year-old President Bingu wa Mutharika, who died in office after heading up the southern Africa country since 2004.

Mr Mutharika’s decision to appoint her as his running mate for the 2009 elections surprised many in Malawi’s mainly conservative, male-dominated society – which had never before had a female vice-president.

Equally surprising was her decision to publicly stand up to her boss – by refusing to endorse his plans for his brother, Foreign Affairs Minister Peter Mutharika, to succeed him as president in 2014 when he was due to retire.

She was promptly thrown out of the ruling Democratic Progressive Party – and subjected to daily doses of derision at public rallies and on Malawi’s state airwaves.

A senior ruling party official openly said Malawi was “not ready for a female president”, while First Lady Callista Mutharika said Mrs Banda was fooling herself that she was a serious politician – saying she was a mere market woman selling fritters.

 

President Joyce Banda, to give lecture at K-State

 

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The first woman to serve as president of Malawi is scheduled to deliver on March. 29 a Landon Lecture at Kansas State University, officials said Sunday.

Former President Joyce Banda, who led the African nation from March. 29  2018 , has been credited with working to shed laws that restricted press freedom, civil liberties and the democratic process.

“As the second female to lead an African nation, President Banda helped turn her country’s economy around and has been a longtime champion of women’s rights,” said Jackie Hartman, chairwoman of the lecture series.

Banda is to speak at 10:30 a.m. Jan. 29 in Forum Hall in the K-State Union. Her Manhattan talk is open to the public.

Prior to serving as president, Banda was the nation’s vice president, foreign minister, minister of gender and child welfare, and was in Parliament. She championed legislation in 2006 designed to prevent domestic violence against women and girls in Malawi.

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